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Don't Miss the Silicon Slopes Event January 19-20 at the Salt Palace

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Don't Miss the Silicon Slopes Event January 19-20 at the Salt Palace

UtahBreakfast.com would like invite you, your employees, and your clients to attend Silicon Slopes Tech Summit on January 19 - 20, 2016, at the Salt Palace in Salt Lake City.

This is going to be a great event for the Utah's tech community, and nationwide. Publicly announced speakers include Benchmark Managing Partner Matt Cohler, StubHub CEO Scott Cutler, Pandora President Mike Herring, Radical Candor Author & Silicon Valley CEO Coach Kim Scott, and Wiseman Group President Liz Wiseman!

The standard ticket price is $95. However, our organization has secured a unique discount code that knocks the ticket down to only $75. Just register at this link to take advantage of this discount: http://bit.ly/BroadbandCensus17

We look forward to seeing you at the event!

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Video of Special Utah Breakfast Club Event, Wednesday, Oct. 26, Noon ET/10 a.m. MT

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, October 26, 2016 - "Polls May Be Underestimating Evan McMullin's Chances in Utah," read an article Tuesday on the respected election forecasting site fivethirthyeight.com.

The presidential contest in Utah becoming "one of the last cliffhanger results in this race." Against that backdrop, four expert Utahs -- including a GOP elector, two former members of the Utah House of Representatives, and the founder of a non-profit organization, the Alliance for a Better Utah -- will speak to the question of the presidential election at a special Utah Breakfast Club event at Noon ET/10 a.m. MT.

CLICK HERE to register to attend the event in person at the Utah State Capitol. To watch online, visit drewclark.com or utahbreakfast.com.

Featured Panelists:

  • Cherilyn Eagar

Cherilyn has served on political boards, as a state/county delegate and a campaign manager and a citizen lobbyist from the local school board, state legislature, Washington DC and at the U.N. She serves on the late Phyllis Schlafly’s national committee on a variety of national projects including leadership development and candidate recruitment, and constitutional studies.

  • Josh Kanter

Josh is chair of the board of the Alliance for a Better Utah, which he founded in 2011. Professionally, he is President of Chicago Investments, Inc. and Vice-President of Windy City, Inc., closely held investment management firms, and counsel to the Chicago law firm Barack, Ferrazzano, Kirschbaum & Nagelberg, specializing in securities, corporate and real estate law. He is also Vice‑President and a Director of the Kanter Family Foundation. 

  • Jim Nielson

Jim served for two terms in the Utah State Legislature, five years on Utah’s Architect Licensing Board, and two years on the National Council of Architectural Registration Board’s program development task force. In 2015 he was elevated to the AIA College of Fellows, a select group of about 3,000 architects nationally on the basic of service to society and the profession with national impact. 

  • Holly Richardson

Known affectionately as “Holly on the Hill,” Holly writes a blog by the same name.  She is a common-sense conservative who has been active in Utah politics for 13 years. She has been active in the Republican Party, including: precinct chair, legislative district chair, county and state delegate, State Central Committee member,  and as a member of the Utah House of Representatives.

  •  Drew Clark, Moderator:

Drew is the founder of the Utah Breakfast Club, a monthly gathering that aims to  enhance advantages and confront challenges of life in Utah. A Utah attorney specializing in telecommunications and technology, he is currently also serving as a consultant to the Gary Johnson-Bill Weld presidential campaign. He is on leave from writing his weekly column for the Deseret Newsand he previously served as Opinion Editor of the publication.

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GOP Elector Eagar, Former Reps. Nielson and Richardson, and Alliance for a Better Utah's Kanter on Wed. Utah Breakfast Club Panel

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, October 25, 2016 - Can it be true that the most Republican state in the country is now up for grabs in the 2016 presidential election?

Come see for yourself and hear a panel of expert Utahns discuss their perspectives on this year's contest at a special Utah Breakfast Club event titled "Utah and the Presidential Election."

Currently, GOP candidate Donald Trump is suffering mightily in the Beehive State. The campaigns of Democrat Hillary Clinton, Libertarian Gary Johnson, and independent Evan McMullin are seeking to capitalize on Trump's woes.

Soon after the Billy Bush / Access Hollywood audiotape of Trump became public, the Deseret News - in a nearly unprecedented editorial - called on Trump to resign from his presidential campaign. The Deseret News had also called for the resignation of former President Bill Clinton in 1998

At a Utah Breakfast Club event at the Utah State Capitol on Wednesday, October 26, former Utah GOP Representatives Jim Nielson and Holly Richardson join with Alliance for a Better Utah Chairman Josh Kanter and GOP Activist and Elector Cherilyn Bacon Eagar to discuss the state of the presidential campaign in the Beehive State.

Please register to attend this FREE event and webcast live from the Utah State Capitol on Wednesday, October 26, 2016.

The event will be streamed live at 10 a.m. MT (Noon ET/11 a.m. CT/10 a.m. MT/9 a.m. PT). If you are attending in person, please arrive at the Auditorium of the State Capitol Office Complex by 9:30 or 9:45 a.m. MT.

The event will take place on Wednesday, October 26, 2016, at the Utah State Capitol Building. The event will be hosted by Drew Clark, founder of the Utah Breakfast Club. Please help spread the word for this FREE event.

Featured Panelists:

  • Cherilyn Eagar

Cherilyn has served on political boards, as a state/county delegate and a campaign manager and a citizen lobbyist from the local school board, state legislature, Washington DC and at the U.N. She serves on the late Phyllis Schlafly’s national committee on a variety of national projects including leadership development and candidate recruitment, and constitutional studies.

  • Josh Kanter

Josh is chair of the board of the Alliance for a Better Utah, which he founded in 2011. Professionally, he is President of Chicago Investments, Inc. and Vice-President of Windy City, Inc., closely held investment management firms, and counsel to the Chicago law firm Barack, Ferrazzano, Kirschbaum & Nagelberg, specializing in securities, corporate and real estate law. He is also Vice‑President and a Director of the Kanter Family Foundation. 

  • Jim Nielson

Jim served for two terms in the Utah State Legislature, five years on Utah’s Architect Licensing Board, and two years on the National Council of Architectural Registration Board’s program development task force. In 2015 he was elevated to the AIA College of Fellows, a select group of about 3,000 architects nationally on the basic of service to society and the profession with national impact. 

  • Holly Richardson

Known affectionately as “Holly on the Hill,” Holly writes a blog by the same name.  She is a common-sense conservative who has been active in Utah politics for 13 years. She has been active in the Republican Party, including: precinct chair, legislative district chair, county and state delegate, State Central Committee member,  and as a member of the Utah House of Representatives.

  • Drew Clark, Moderator:

Drew is the founder of the Utah Breakfast Club, a monthly gathering that aims to  enhance advantages and confront challenges of life in Utah. A Utah attorney specializing in telecommunications and technology, he is currently also serving as a consultant to the Gary Johnson-Bill Weld presidential campaign. He is on leave from writing his weekly column for the Deseret Newsand he previously served as Opinion Editor of the publication.

REGISTER HERE to attend this FREE Event!

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New Utah Breakfast Club Event on 'Utah and the Presidential Election

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New Utah Breakfast Club Event on 'Utah and the Presidential Election

Utah and the Presidential Election - Rescheduled for Wednesday, October 26, at 10 a.m. MT!

Please join former Utah legislators Rep. Jim NielsonRep. Holly Richardson, andAlliance for a Better Utah founder Josh Kanter at an existing event, "Utah and the Presidential Election" scheduled for Wednesday, October 26, 2016, at the Utah State Capitol Building. The event will be hosted by Drew Clark, founder of the Utah Breakfast Club. Please help spread the word for this FREE event - and RSVP HERE!

Utah is in a unique position with this presidential election. In previous presidential elections, the state has been the most Republican in the country. But Election 2016 may be an exception. We'll gather business, political and thought leaders in Utah to discuss the unique circumstances of the presidential contest, and how the Democratic, Republican, Libertarian and independent candidates might fare.

Please register to attend this FREE event and webcast live from the Utah State Capitol on Wednesday, October 26, 2016. The event will be streamed live at 10 a.m. MT (Noon ET/11 a.m. CT/10 a.m. MT/9 a.m. PT). If you are attending in person, please arrive at the Auditorium of the State Capitol Office Complex by 9:30 or 9:45 a.m. MT.

Featured Panelists:

  • Josh Kanter

Josh is chair of the board of the Alliance for a Better Utah, which he founded in 2011. Professionally, he is President of Chicago Investments, Inc. and Vice-President of Windy City, Inc., closely held investment management firms, and counsel to the Chicago law firm Barack, Ferrazzano, Kirschbaum & Nagelberg, specializing in securities, corporate and real estate law. He is also Vice‑President and a Director of the Kanter Family Foundation, a not-for-profit private charitable foundation and President and Director of Art Enterprises, Ltd., owner of a contemporary art collection.

Josh moved to Salt Lake City in 2002, and he served on Governor Huntsman’s Utah Methamphetamine Joint Task Force Subcommittee on Public Awareness. He is a member of the Salt Lake County Justice Court Nominating Commission. In 2010, Josh co-chaired the Corroon for Governor finance committee, and in 2012, he was elected as a Representative of the Granite Community Council. Josh has received aHeart and Hands Award from the Utah Nonprofits Association, and in 2011, was named to the Community Foundation of Utah’s E-5-0, an annual selection of 50 “enlightened entrepreneurs.”

Josh received a B.A. in Economics and Political Science and graduated magna cum laude from Emory University in 1984. Thereafter, Mr. Kanter received his J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School in 1987. He has been a board or council member of numerous non-profit groups, including the Temple Har Shalom art committee, the University of Chicago Law School Campaign Planning Group, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, and the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art.Methamphetamine Joint Task Force Subcommittee on Public Awareness. He is a member of the Salt Lake County Justice Court Nominating Commission. In 2010, Josh co-chaired the Corroon for Governor finance committee, and in 2012, he was elected as a Representative of the Granite Community Council. Josh has received aHeart and Hands Award from the Utah Nonprofits Association, and in 2011, was named to the Community Foundation of Utah’s E-5-0, an annual selection of 50 “enlightened entrepreneurs.” He and his wife Catherine live in Sandy with their two children.

  • Jim Nielson

 

Jim Nielson is a former member of the Utah House of Representatives. When he ran for office in 2010, he introduced himself as a husband and father of five, who had been born and raised in Utah and an 18-year resident of Bountiful; an architect and business owner by profession, and vigorous advocate of traditional values and strengthening our communities.

By the end of his service he had become a grandfather and welcomed another wonderful daughter-in-law to the family. Shortly after his term ended, he and his wife Marilyn reached 22 years in their Bountiful home.

In both campaigns, he was endorsed by by the National Federation of Independent Business.  The NFIB is the professional association of small businesses, which are the engines of our economy. He is an advocate for 2nd Amendment rights, was pleased to receive the endorsement of the NRA Political Victory Fund for both campaigns. And in 2012, the Utah Business Coalition named him one of Utah's Top 30 Business-Friendly Legislators. Since his re-election campaign, he was named Downtown Champion two years in a row (in 2013 and 2014) by the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce. He even had a couple of banners with his name and picture on them hanging on light poles in the central business district.

  • Holly Richardson

Known affectionately as “Holly on the Hill,” Holly writes a blog by the same name.  She is a common-sense conservative who has been active in Utah politics for 13 years. She has been active in the Republican Party, including: precinct chair, legislative district chair, county and state delegate, State Central Committee member,  and as a member of the Utah House of Representatives. In May 2013, GOP state party chairman Thomas Wright recognized her dedication with the “Chairman’s Award for Outstanding Service.”

She lives in Pleasant Grove, which she has chosen to raise her large, diverse family because of shared community values. A member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Holly believes that service improves lives and has been an active volunteer in her community and her church for many years.

She served on the Pleasant Grove Beautification Commission, volunteered with the county as a master gardener and food preserver, served on the Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities, and presided as chair of a professional licensing board. Governor Gary Herbert nominated Holly for her appointment on the State Records Committee. She was also awarded the prestigious Silver Beaver Award by the Boy Scouts of America.

She graduated as a Registered Nurse (RN) from Brigham Young University and subsequently obtained a degree in Midwifery.  She was one of Utah’s first Licensed Direct-Entry Midwives, and has been an adjunct professor in BYU’s College of Nursing and was the president of the Midwives’ College of Utah.  She is an unparalleled advocated for families; she and her husband Greg are the parents of 24 children.

  • Drew Clark, Moderator:

Drew is the founder of the Utah Breakfast Club, a monthly gathering that aims to  enhance advantages and confront challenges of life in Utah. A Utah attorney specializing in telecommunications and technology, he is currently also serving as a consultant to the Gary Johnson-Bill Weld presidential campaign. He is on leave from writing his weekly column for theDeseret Newsand he previously served as Opinion Editor of the publication.

He has led efforts nationally to promote progress in broadband communications. As a journalist, has written widely for Ars Technica, GigaOm, National Journal, Slate, the Washington Post, and for UtahBreakfast.com and BroadbandBreakfast.com. He is also the founder of the Broadband Breakfast Club in Washington, D.C. Drew has been involved in community service in McLean, Virginia (as a member of the McLean Community Center governing board); Springfield, Illinois (where Executive Director of Broadband Illinois, and a board member of the Sangamon Valley Youth Orchestra); and Orem, Utah, where he is a currently a member of the City's Public Works Advisory Commission.

WHEN

October 26, 2016 at 10am - 11am

WHERE

Utah State Capitol Office Complex - Auditorium
450 N State St
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
United States
Google map and directions

CONTACT

Drew Clark · drew@drewclark.com · 8013689642

REGISTER TO PARTICIPATE

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What Example Will Utah Republicans Set for the Nation?

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What Example Will Utah Republicans Set for the Nation?

The following opinion piece was published in the Deseret News on Sunday, April 17, in advance of the State Republican Party Convention on Saturday, April 23.

Utah is the most Republican state in the nation, based on quadrennial presidential election voting. That's why examining the Utah Republican Party and state-wide races might yield some clues into the current quandary about the heart and soul of the national party.

The typical Utah Republican says, “Why would the national party even consider nominating a candidate like Donald Trump?”

Utah Republicans soundly rejected him on March 24, voting 69 percent for Ted Cruz, 17 percent for John Kasich, and only 14 percent for the New Yorker. Wisconsin has continued the pro-Cruz, anti-Trump momentum, effectively ensuring a contested national convention in Cleveland.

Pondering the issues of concern to Utah Republicans might help provide some lessons and advice on how a national tea party movement needs to grow up.

Or in other words, can the anger-filled movement inspired by the Boston revolt eventually mature into a Philadelphia vision of constructive constitutionalism?

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Does the Core of the Republican Party Need to Look Elsewhere for a Standard Bearer?

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Does the Core of the Republican Party Need to Look Elsewhere for a Standard Bearer?

The following opinion piece was published in the Deseret News on Sunday, March 5 -- days following Mitt Romney's speech about .the threat posed by Donald Trump.

Four men remain in contention to be the next presidential nominee of the Republican Party. Last Thursday, 2012 standard-bearer Mitt Romney said that one of these men was not like the other.

Call it an unendorsement speech.

At least it also was a recognition that of the other three candidates — Sen. Ted Cruz, Gov. John Kasich and Sen. Marco Rubio — each has something of compelling case for their party's nomination. "One of these men should be our nominee," Romney said.

Romney's substantive and serious argument was "an extraordinary public rebuke" of the party's front-runner, said the New York Times.

Romney used logic and reason to emphasize the devastating costs that would follow from trade wars, and impulsive and rash foreign policy positions.

And he laid out the path that Republicans must take as they approach their July convention in Cleveland: "If we Republicans choose Donald Trump as our nominee, the prospects for a safe and prosperous future are greatly diminished."

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The Need for Republican Delegates to Look Beyond the Current Front Runner

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The Need for Republican Delegates to Look Beyond the Current Front Runner

The following opinion piece was published in the Deseret News on Sunday, January 17 -- before the voting in the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primaries.

We're in a silly season of American politics, and with the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary upon us, we're about to see if American politics can get any sillier.

As a supporter of our form of democracy in a constitutional republic, I do put my trust in the voters.

But that thought simply prompts remembrance of the line made famous by former Republican President Ronald Reagan: "Trust, but verify."

What must be verified? In my mind, it's nothing short of whether "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." The line, of course, was uttered by our first Republican president, Abraham Lincoln — when our country was arguably in its darkest days.

Syndicated columnist Michael Gerson (and former speechwriter for George W. Bush) posed this question on these pages last week: What is the worst-case scenario for the Republican Party? "The worst outcome for the party would be the nomination of Donald Trump."

Although Trump might still defeat the Democratic nominee, whoever she or he is, Gerson wrote that "Trump's nomination would not be the temporary victory of one of the GOP's ideological factions. It would involve the replacement of the humane ideal at the center of the party and its history. If Trump were the nominee, the GOP would cease to be."

I agree. The situation could become that dire.

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Looking Back on Top Utah News Stories of 2015

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Looking Back on Top Utah News Stories of 2015

From Drew Clark's column in the Deseret News on Sunday, December 27, 2015:

In some ways, Utah has never been more integrated into the United States than it is right now. With its diverse and thriving economy, its greater access to venture capital, and world-class recreation in national parks and ski resorts, the state is the envy of the rest of the country.

But in other key respects, Utah stands apart from the crowd. It continues to have unique demographics, the highest percentage of Republicans, and a commitment to following its unique path on a range of issues articulated below. From having favorite adopted son Mitt Romney as the Republican nominee in 2012, four years later Utahns are scratching their head at what appears to be happening to "their" political party.

This dual perspective — Utah-as-paradigmatic versus Utah-as-holdout — frames my own “top 10” list of the newsiest stories impacting Utah this past year:

1. Same-sex marriage — The national landscape on family law has been transformed by the Supreme Court's June decision instituting same-sex marriage across the country. Utah's unique contribution was its Legislature's passage in March of employment and housing antidiscrimination legislation. In guaranteeing the religious freedoms of those who object to the judicial redefinition of marriage, Utah provided a path that honors the individual rights of gays and lesbians, as well as those of all religious beliefs, and preserves social peace.

2. The immigration debate — Nationally, the political pre-election season that began this summer has been dominated by alternating attacks on Mexican immigration and Muslim refugees. Utah again provides a welcome breath of fresh air. This newspaper has applauded Utah Gov. Gary Herbert for being the only Republican governor willing to allow Syrian refugees to settle in his state. We need more Republicans to challenge the nativism currently gripping the party.

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Drew Clark: What Makes Utah Great? Families, Inclusiveness and Collaboration

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Drew Clark: What Makes Utah Great? Families, Inclusiveness and Collaboration

My column from today's Deseret News continues the theme about some of the things for which I am thankful at this time of year. This piece provides one take on some of the reasons that make Utah such a great place to live and work.

I frequently travel throughout the United States on business. I'm always thankful when I fly into the Salt Lake City airport and realize I am home.

Many others who live here love it. For example, at the StartFest technology conference earlier this fall in Provo, several panels probed what makes Utah so hospitable to entrepreneurship. And yet, said organizer Clint Betts: "It’s hard to put your finger on what makes Utah so unique and special.”

Part of the "problem" is that right now the state has so many advantages, from the country's most thriving economy to unparalleled venues for natural recreation.

In this season of Thanksgiving, I'd like to highlight four other, unique threads that knit together into the fabric of the state's culture.

Family and kid-friendly

As anyone here in the state for more than a few days can attest, Utah has a lot of kids! It has the second-highest family size in the nation, after Hawaii, and the 11th lowest percentage of children in poverty. The prevalence of children also leads to the lowest median age of any state. At 29.6, the state is eight years younger than the nation as a whole, and four years younger than the next closest state.

Even those without large families or without children recognize and respect the premium that Utah's culture places on families and on family time.

Evidence comes from the prices that museums charge to accommodate large families, or from houses with a bedroom or two more than is normal elsewhere in the country. The prevalence of many children in the state breathes a culture of life and energy into everything that happens here.

Welcoming and inclusive

People are friendly here. This virtue is hard to quantify. But I know that our family's experience of receiving countless gifts of bread, peaches, sweets and other welcoming gestures is by no means unique.

For example, I had lunch not long ago with a friend who relocated from Chicago. He and his husband recently relocated to Salt Lake City. They were expecting a culture shock, but what they got instead were neighbors who delivered cookies. "We never got this in Chicago," he said.

While the national news media lavished headlines on the recent election of an openly gay mayor in Salt Lake City, Utahns have long known that the state's welcoming attitude is not limited or parsimonious.

A cooperative spirit

Utah's business community is thriving and the free market philosophy is widespread in the state. None of this diminishes the strength of its collective approach to tackling community problems.

This may come from Utah's pioneering role in the cooperative movement, where collective entities facilitated the public provision of everything from power plants to banks. "While the co-operative movement was a worldwide phenomena in the 1800s, it was particularly strong and pervasive early on in Utah," accord to "Extension, Enterprise, and Education: The Legacy of Co-operatives and Cooperation in Utah," of Utah State University.

"Nineteenth-century Utah pioneers embraced the spirit of cooperation, building shared irrigation systems and establishing co-op stores within their communities."

That philosophy even carries on today. It can be seen in collaborative approaches to preparing for the 2002 Winter Olympics, this year’s process of relocating the state prison, the state’s openness to immigration and refugees, and in communities banding together to build modern-day fiber-optic infrastructure. In sum, Utahns understand that home-grown solutions may be necessary when outside approaches or institutions aren't bringing out the best for the state.

Good moral values

Moral choices are by nature individual. But the collective impact of countless such decisions has a decided impact on the moral climate of a community.

Take three widely recognized vices: Gambling, promiscuous sexual activity and alcohol abuse. People of many religions (or of no religious views) can recognize the detriments to public health imposed by such behaviors.

Put another way, would you rather live in Potterville, or in Bedford Falls, of the classic Frank Capra movie, "It's a Wonderful Life"? We can readily see that when states and communities cater to base instincts and lack the public-spiritedness or civic duty of George Bailey, we live in a poorer and less desirable place.

Measuring statistics on such activities is particularly tricky. But on those that can be tracked, Utah scores very well. Utah and Hawaii are the only two states with no legalized gambling, for example. In regard to the number of bars or establishments with alcohol, Utah ranks either near the bottom or at the bottom.

Living in a family friendly, a welcoming and a collaborative state is — I submit — the real reason Utah continues to do so well on so many national rankings of “quality of life.” It can be hard to put one’s finger on what makes Utah great. But it’s worth the effort to do so.

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Drew Clark: Once 'Athens of the West,' a Kentucky city seeks revival and improvements | Deseret News

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Drew Clark: Once 'Athens of the West,' a Kentucky city seeks revival and improvements | Deseret News

This column of mine, "Once 'Athens of the West,' a Kentucky city seeks revival and improvements," was originally published in the Deseret News of Salt Lake City, Utah. Here is a complete list of my weekly columns for the paper.

LEXINGTON, Ky. — This city now best-known for horse racing and bourbon was, 200 years ago, once described as the "Athens of the West."

And while east-central Kentucky has since gone through its economic ups and downs, last month the state's civic leaders announced an ambitious fiber-optic development project that boosters say will once again put Kentucky in the national spotlight.

Lexington enjoyed its early heyday from its founding in 1787 until the early decades of the 19th century. Its most notable resident was Henry Clay, the lawyer who became one of the three most influential national legislators (with Daniel Webster and John C. Calhoun) of the antebellum era.

Clay, the founder of the Whig Party, was a vigorous advocate of the "American System" of internal improvements. Today we would describe these as infrastructure investments.

It was the internal improvement sought by Clay that made transportation possible across the Western frontier. They began creating a truly national marketplace.

Lexington bequeathed us another figure sympathetic to the Whig cause: Mary Todd Lincoln. Visiting the museum here that was her home, I learned that her father — a member of the Kentucky Legislature — frequently invited his politically minded young daughter to sit in on meetings with constituents.

Mary Todd left Lexington, or course. More than 400 miles west, in Springfield, Illinois, she met and fell in love with a more hardscrabble Kentuckian. Abraham Lincoln also was a strong proponent of "internal improvements."

Indeed, Lincoln's first political brochure as a young man running for the state Legislature included this statement: "Time and experience have verified to a demonstration, the public utility of internal improvements. That the poorest and most thinly populated countries would be greatly benefitted by the opening of good roads, and in the clearing of navigable streams within their limits, is what no person will deny."

Today, America knows and reveres President Lincoln for his belief in equal opportunity. But what is it about this core value that connects him to the principle that brought him into public life?

"Lincoln knew firsthand the deprivations, the marginal livelihood of the subsistence farmer unable to bring produce to market without dependable roads," writes historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. "Primitive roads, clogged waterways, lack of rail connections, inadequate schools — such were not merely issues to Lincoln, but hurdles he had worked all his life to overcome in order to earn an ampler share of freedom."

And so it is today that modern-day Kentuckians are returning, in a bipartisan fashion, to the political creed of Henry Clay and Abraham Lincoln.

The project has the blessing of Democratic Gov. Steve Bashear and House Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rodger, a Republican from eastern Kentucky. The object of their "internal improvements" is a statewide public-private broadband network called Kentucky Wired.

Unveiled at the Broadband Communities conference here by Lt. Gov. Crit Luallen, this 3,400-mile gigabit network will be an open access network available to everyone. Financed and built primarily by Macquarie Capital, an Australian infrastructure company, Kentucky Wired is controlled and ultimately owned by the state government.

The project is indeed best analogized to a state highway.

In our interconnected digital world, bits of light travel from San Francisco to Chicago to Washington over plentiful and inexpensive "backhaul" networks. These are like interstate highways.

Viewed in the other direction, from the vantage point of a home, a consumer uploading video files onto YouTube sends out data traveling over "last mile" connections, be they copper or co-axial or fiber. These are like neighborhood roads.

In the middle lies the "middle mile." These are the fiber network that connect central cities to nodes, or access points, within each of the 140 county seats in Kentucky.

While some states, including Utah, have invested smartly in the middle mile, others like Kentucky have lagged far behind. Creating such an open access middle-mile network will allow any company to bring better and more competitive telecommunications to neighborhoods. Just as anyone could float their boat on a navigable river, these statewide highways of information commerce facilitate a now-global marketplace.

"Broadband is like electricity, water and sewer" service, said Luallen, adding that good-quality fiber-optic networks are as necessary for improving government services as for economic development. And yet in state rankings for Internet service, she said, "Kentucky ranked dead last."

This new project is an effort to shift those fortunes. In the deal the state brokered with Macquarie, the Australian company finances and builds the $324 million network over three years. It also operates it for 30 years, and is paid when the state moves $29 million of annual telecommunications business onto the high-capacity Kentucky Wired.

For its modest initial investment, the state gets full ownership after 30 years. And more significantly, Kentucky citizens and businesses get reliable access to the infrastructure they need today.

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How Tech Companies are Making a Home in Utah's Entrepreneurial Climate

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How Tech Companies are Making a Home in Utah's Entrepreneurial Climate

Editor's Note: Cross-posted on BroadbandBreakfast.com, the site devoted to following Gigabit Networks, broadband usage and universal connectivity.

In Gigabit City Provo, Utah, a Startup Ecosystem Thrives in Good Soil and Deepening Roots

Broadband's Impact September 11th, 2015

Drew Clark, Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com

PROVO, Utah, September 11, 2015 – Utah is uniquely hospitable to entrepreneurship, and its deepening roots in software and search analytics have enabled it to become a significant technology hub, said Gov. Gary Herbert and a host of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and national journalists participating in the first annual Startfest here.

The startup festival last week featured more than 200 speakers and panels, including CEOs or top executives from Domo, Qualtrics, Pluralsight, Maritz CX, MX, Oracle, Vivint and a score of VCs.

“Utah, in a lot of ways, is a stronger and vibrant community than Austin, Texas; or Boulder, Colorado; and yet they get an insane amount of press,” said Clint Betts, the founder of the publication BeehiveStartups.com, which hosted the event.

Timed to coincide with Provo’s annual “Rooftop Concert Series,” showcasing local bands, and the smartphone-focused Pocket Film Fest, the event also concluded with a Google Fiber-sponsored “hackathon” devoted to helping develop applications for Gigabit fiber connectivity.

Cheerleader-in-Chief Gov. Gary Herbert

“I see Utah rising like cream to the top,” said Herbert, governor of the 33rd largest state since 2009, and who is running for re-election in 2016. He kicked off the panel programs on Tuesday, September 1, with a speech followed by a question and answer session with Betts.

“That doesn’t mean we don’t have challenges, but we are on the right road and going in the right direction,” said Herbert.

Herbert said his job is being a cheerleader for the state: “Mainly, it is making people aware that if you invest in Utah, your chances of success are greater than elsewhere.”

As the newly sworn-in chairman of the National Governor’s Association, Herbert has the opportunity to frequently tout the state. He told of an interaction in which Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo asked him, “What is it about Utah?”

But Herbert got some pushback on his boosterism from Betts, particularly regarding the controversy over Zenefits, an online benefits company. Herbert’s insurance commissioner told the San Francisco-based company in late 2014 that its free business model was illegal in Utah. After pushback from local techies, and from the governor himself, the Utah legislature passed legislation in March 2015 overturning that ruling.

Telling the Qualtrics Story

Within Utah’s technology ecosystem, there are five billion-dollar companies, based on market capitalization. Most are in software or search analytics.

They are Qualtrics, a leading online survey tool; Domo, a “big data” analytics engine; Pluralsight, an online educational platform, and InsideSales, a lead-generation tool. Vivint, a major home automation company, and which also includes wireless and solar divisions, weighs in with roughly a $2 billion market capitalization.

In an interview at the festival with TechCrunch journalist Sarah Buhr, Qualtrics CEO Ryan Smith recounted its founding story. Going to college in Los Angeles, Smith dropped out when he learned that his father had cancer with a prognosis of three month to live.

He came home to Provo, where his father was a professor of marketing at Brigham Young University, to spend time with his dad. Smith brought his technical skills to online surveys, and soon Qualtrics was born. His father, who outlived the terminal diagnosis, and his brother, a former Google executive, constitute the company’s core leadership together with Smith. 

In part because venture capital in Utah has been hard to come by recent years, Qualtrics financed itself by bootstrapping. Indeed, the company had obtained to $50 million in revenue before it received any serious funding offers.

Then, all of a sudden, everything was on the table, said Smith. The company got an offer that might have led the family to sell the company. Or it could continue on its organic growth path. Or it could take on new capital investment.

He faced the dilemma of successful entrepreneurs: “There is nothing wrong with the business, it is scaling beautifully, and yet there is a multi-billion opportunity,” said Smith. Fundamentally, he wanted to control his destiny – but without turning his back of what the company could become.

“My goal at Qualtrics is to write my own story; I don’t want others to write it for me.”

He decided to take the investment. One year ago, Qualtrics brought in $150 million in venture capital, a sum that bumped Utah last year to sixth in the nation for venture capital.

“I believe you can do this in Utah,” said Smith, referring to his intent to grow the company further and further. “There are probably five to six really big companies with founders who have the ability to write their own story. They haven’t sold out yet, and they want to do something big.”

And the upside? Everyone is still only “in the third of fourth or fifth inning,” he said.

College Friends and Fellow Entrepreneurs

Josh James is CEO of Domo and one of Utah’s most successful tech executives. He built Omniture into an analytics powerhouse and then sold it to Adobe for $1.8 billion in 2009. The division remains based in Utah, with the high-profile Adobe building overlooking the booming City of Lehi in Utah County.

James took the stage with his friend and former BYU college friend Jeff Kearl, now CEO of the lifestyle/clothing company Stance. Previously, Kearl played a key role in founding Skullcandy, the headphone and peripheral manufacturer based in Park City, Utah.

Both James and Kearl are bullish on Utah, although Stance is based in San Diego to be closer to surfing. Their wide-ranging “conversation among friends,” moderated by Greg Warnock of Mercado Ventures, touched on everything from the unique peculiarities of Utah’s business culture to Kearl’s past antics in arbitraging frequent flyer miles from Kellogg’s waffle packaging.

James, for example, addressed the need to actively court tech talent from out of state.

“We give them the red carpet treatment,” said James. “We send flowers to their spouse. We make sure to carve out at least an hour to show them real estate” – so they can see how much of home they could buy in Utah, versus Silicon Valley. “We invite the smartest engineers to spend time talking, and shield them from the ones that don’t come across that way.”

That morphed into a discussion about building a corporate culture that will be valued by all-import tech-savvy millennials. 

“Work is different today than 20-30 years ago, when we went to factories and produced things. Then on Friday it was over,” said Kearl.

‘The information age created a bunch of companies with computers and conference rooms. It has shifted the activities that happen in the day. This is a different type of work: social dynamics are much more different, and the millennials punctuate this.”

“I don’t want to call someone at 9 p.m. at home and have them not take my call,” said Kearl. “Yet if I am going to ask [24 by 7 availability], I have to create a workplace that allows employees to go to their kids’ activities, or to go out for a surf.”

“We just say, ‘life is holistic,’ so let’s work together and not break [work and home life] apart.”

Leading From the Front: Nike, Apple, Vivint

Jeff Lyman, Chief Marketing Officer of Vivint, spoke about the need for companies to “lead from the front.” Formerly with Nike, Lyman told the story of Steve Prefontaine, the legendary University of Oregon runner and who became the model and muse for Nike’s aggressive approach to business marketing.

Lyman said most distance athletes, runners and bicyclists, race in a pack. Not Prefontaine. He had the courage to break out the pack early: To dominate the race from beginning to end.

That’s what Nike began to do with marketing more than a decade ago. It stopped viewing the shoe sale as the completion of a marketing campaign. Rather, the sale was the first point of contact in the cycle of digital communication with the customer.

“Nike was reinventing itself and the relationship with the customer,” he said. “It was not marketing to you, but bringing you in and building loyalty.” That’s led to a database of 60 million “members.” Yet it’s acquired that at fraction of the cost of competitors.

Apple showed the same courage in launching the iPhone without a keyboard, in dropping the traditional clamshell design, and abandoning conventional web browsing technology. Those choices, he said, put Apple five years ahead of any other phone.

Vivint has done that for home security and automation, he said. It has reconfigured the entire value chain: product, sales cycle, installation, customer service, home automation and filed service.

For example, CEO Todd Pedersen was dissatisfied with Honeywell wall monitors. Yet, said Lyman, board members told him: “Stay back in the pack; don’t take the risk. Let’s just keep doing what everyone else is doing.”

Bucking that advice, the company has tackled each element of the value chain to become a leader in the smart home platform. The company sees 80 percent of security service subscribers signing up for smart home services (versus a 45 percent industry average), and obtains $63 in month recurring average revenue per user (versus a $39 industry average), he said.

Finding an Oracle Home in Park City

In a “fireside chat” late on Tuesday, Oracle Chief Information Officer Mark Sunday talked about his company, and why Sunday has chosen to make Utah the base for his work at the company. 

First Sunday worked for 7.5 years as the top technology officer for Tom Siebel and his database company Siebel Systems. Acquired by Oracle in 2006, Sunday has since run the technology show at Oracle, a Redwood Shores, California-based software giant with nearly $40 billion in annual revenue.

His secret for longevity at these tech giants? “You always put the company first,” said Sunday, speaking in the second person about himself, even “when it hurts you personally.”

Sunday extolled the vision and corporate leadership of Larry Ellison, whom combines the attributes of “the vision of where things are going; being willing to make the ‘bet the company’ call; and the ability to instill direction into the company culture.”

As an example of a “bet the company” move, he recounted Ellison’s decision, after only six days of review, to buy competitor Sun Microsystems when others had passed over such an opportunity. In recent years, Ellison has instilled a much stronger uniformity throughout Oracle than in its “early decentralized days.”

Sunday said there were many benefits to being located in Utah. Siebel Systems faced power shortages in California in 2001, and sought a backup facility within a day’s drive of Silicon Valley. 

Salt Lake City outclassed Las Vegas, Phoenix, Portland and Seattle. It didn’t hurt that former Utah Governor Mike Leavitt used the invitations to the 2002 Salt Lake Winter Olympics to entice Sunday to make that move.

“I live in Utah because I choose to live here,” said Sunday. “While I am not part of the dominant faith here, it has been a great experience here for family. I don’t know a single person here” for whom that hasn’t been the case, he boasted.

Living in Park City, a ski resort, has also broadened his professional horizons. “When I moved to Utah from San Francisco, I thought it would be like moving to Fiji: A great place to live, but my professional network would end.”

Instead, he said of his family’s experience, “We made connections that we never would have made had we lived in California.”

‘This is the Place’ for Tech Startups

USA Today reporter Jefferson Graham led a panel discussion on Wednesday about “Silicon Slopes: What is Driving Utah’s Tech Success?” It included the CEOs of Health Catalyst and Pluralsight, plus Betts.

“It’s hard to put your finger on what makes Utah so unique and special,” said Betts, although he and the others did highlight a dedicated workforce that prizes education and initiative, particularly in Utah County around Provo/Orem. It is home to both BYU and the large public Utah Valley University. It was also the birthplace of the once-formidable technology companies Novell and WordPerfect.

Beehive Startups hosted a major tech event in January in Salt Lake City, yet 70 percent of the attendees came from Utah County. That’s led the company to move its main event to Provo.

Even one of the early challenges formerly faced by Utah-based entrepreneurs may have proven to be a blessing, said Pluralsight CEO Aaron Skonnard. Rather than building up venture-backed companies into which revenues would eventually flow, “we took a very different approach – although common for Utah – rooted in the fact that we haven’t had much venture capital. You are forced to produce cash-flow early on.”

Still, for vibrant tech startups, it is “easy to feel trapped inside the state when everyone is flying over,” he said, particularly when “you don’t have a good PR strategy; you don’t have a wake to make noise.”

But things have definitely changed over the past two to three years, said Skonnard: “More and more investors are paying close attention to Utah and more actively. And if you fast forward 10 years, things will change even more. There will be a lot of companies, with a lot of wealth and success, and that will feed into more and more awareness in the West and in the East.”

Drew Clark is Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com. He tracks the development of Gigabit Networks, broadband usage, the universal service fund and wireless policy @BroadbandCensus. He is also Of Counsel with the firm of Kirton McConkie, based in Salt Lake City, Utah, which enhances clients’ ability to construct and operate high-speed broadband networks in public-private partnerships. You can find him on LinkedINGoogle+ and Twitter. The articles and posts on BroadbandBreakfast.com and affiliated social media are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors. Clark brings experts and practitioners together to advance the benefits provided by broadband: job creation, telemedicine, online learning, public safety, energy, transportation and eGovernment.  

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Drew Clark: It makes sense to relocate the prison away from Draper | Deseret News

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Drew Clark: It makes sense to relocate the prison away from Draper | Deseret News

My third of four articles on prison relocation in Utah:

DRAPER, Utah, August 9, 2015 — Utah's economy is growing rapidly, and so is its population. These facts influence the emerging common-sense viewpoint that it's time to relocate the state prison from its current home here.

As I’ve approached the subject from many vantage points, including the perspectives of former inmates andprison volunteers, I’ve come away impressed with the state’s fair-minded and comprehensive approach to relocation. Of the four sites under consideration, the industrial-zoned site west of the Salt Lake City Airport stands out as a superior alternative on which to build.

Utah is a unique state in significant ways. Our strong economy, second only to North Dakota's natural gas boomlet, is driven by high-tech entrepreneurship, by population growth and by a healthy birth rate. The state can seem rural, but is the sixth-most urban statebecause population is centered along the benches and valleys of the Wasatch Front.

Given the near-doubling of population, from 2.9 million today to an expected 5.4 million in 2050, we need to be conscious and not cavalier about social and land-use decisions like the location of our largest prison. [...]

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Drew Clark: Utah prison volunteers provide a caution against a distant relocation | Deseret News

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Drew Clark: Utah prison volunteers provide a caution against a distant relocation | Deseret News

My second of four articles on prison relocation in Utah:

DRAPER, Utah, August 2, 2015 — Utah's rate of voluntarism is the highest in the nation, and that apparently extends to the number of individuals that serve as mentors, trainers or religious volunteers within the walls of the Utah State Prison.

The 1,200 volunteers that serve in the Draper facility are a key reason — and the most persuasive one — for doing everything possible to keep a new prison as close as possible to the current one.

"You just don't see numbers anywhere near what you see in Utah," said Brad Sassatelli, a former warden at three different prisons in Illinois and now a corrections consultant working for Utah's Prison Relocation Commission.

The federal government's National Institute for Corrections doesn't appear to have any state-by-state comparisons of volunteers. But Sassatelli said that a typical facility outside of Utah might have 100 to 200 volunteers. Of those, maybe 30 will regularly come to the prison, while the rest might visit once or twice a year.

Even accounting for the large size of the Draper prison — with 4,000 inmates, it is more than twice the size of an average state prison — the number of volunteers is exceptional. Consider further than many of those 1,200 volunteers visit the facility on a biweekly basis.[...]

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Drew Clark: We need to consider inmates' needs in prison relocation discussion | Deseret News

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Drew Clark: We need to consider inmates' needs in prison relocation discussion | Deseret News

My first of four pieces on relocating the prison in Utah:

DRAPER, Utah, July 26, 2015 — Utah is squarely in the midst of a statewide debate over whether and where to relocate the Utah State Prison at the Point of the Mountain.

It is a complicated political and administrative issue that deserves to be viewed from many vantage points. What’s positive is that the state is in fact undertaking a healthy public process surrounding relocation.

Almost everyone agrees that the decision about what to do should not be primarily about the dollar impact upon the state budget, or how it will impact local or regional economic development — but upon how it would impact, and hopefully improve, the state's criminal justice system.

In other words, whether and where to move the prison should be primarily driven by how it will affect the rehabilitation of inmates.

And by and large, advocates for prisoners — and former prisoners interviewed for these columns — are pleased that it appears a new prison likely will be built somewhere other than its current location in Draper. [...]

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Watch a Lively Debate on Public Lands from the June Utah Breakfast Club Event

SALT LAKE CITY, June 18, 2015 - Given the passions that issues of public lands enflame, perhaps it is surprising that advocates on all sides of the debate are so supportive of the process Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, has kicked off with his Public Lands Initiative.

The Utah Breakfast Club features six divergent perspectives on the initiative at its June 11 luncheon event. A highlights video, together with the complete video of the event, are embedded below.

Watching it, you can see the vibrant debate surrounding issues of roads across federal lands, vegetation management, the role of county commissioners in the initiative, and whether competing proposals seeking to put federal lands under state control are a help or hindrance to the Public Lands Initiative.

To stay informed about Utah Breakfast Club events, sign up for our email newsletter.

On the left is Casey Snider, legislative director for Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah; on the right is David Garbett; staff counsel for the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance.

On the left is Cody Stewart, policy director for Utah Gov. Gary Herbert; on the right is Patrick Shea, former director of the U.S. Interior Department's Bureau of Land Management.

Panelists participating in the event included:

  • David Garbett, Staff Counsel, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance
  • Patrick Shea, Former Director of the Bureau of Land Management
  • Casey Snider, Legislative Director, Rep. Rob Bishop, Utah's First District
  • Cody Stewart, Policy Director, Office of Gov. Gary Herbert
  • Michael Swenson, Swenson Strategies
  • Mark Ward, Utah Association of Counties 
  • Moderator: Drew Clark, Of Counsel, Kirton McConkie; Founder, Utah Breakfast Club

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Drew Clark: Innovation debate between rival visions promotes progress and useful arts

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Drew Clark: Innovation debate between rival visions promotes progress and useful arts

My column from Sunday's Deseret News touches upon patent reform, which is actually a subject of strong interest to a range of Utah-based businesses.

“Innovation” is among the most highly prized civic and commercial virtues today. So much so that opposing sides in policy contests each claim its mantle.

Nowhere is this truer than in now-bubbling debate on Capitol Hill in Washington over patent reform. This isn’t a battle of David against Goliath. It’s a battle of Goliath against Goliath.

And the divisions aren’t based on political party. In the Senate, the co-sponsors of the bipartisan PATENT Act are deep-red Republicans Orrin Hatch of Utah and Chuck Grassley of Iowa, and dark-blue Democrats Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Chuck Schumer of New York.

The bill, a convenient acronym for Protecting American Talent and Entrepreneurship Act, passed the Senate Judiciary Committee June 4 on a 16-4 vote. On Thursday, the House Judiciary Committee considered companion bipartisan legislation known as the “Innovation Act.”

The bills’ target is that frequently derided species known as the “patent troll”: those who use a bogus claim and impose a litigation toll on an innocent entrepreneur going about creating jobs and driving economic prosperity.
— http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865630698/Innovation-debate-between-rival-visions-promotes-progress-and-useful-arts.html


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Drew Clark: Congress should modernize highway funding with 'chips,' not 'concrete'

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Drew Clark: Congress should modernize highway funding with 'chips,' not 'concrete'

My column in Sunday's Deseret News discusses the need to ensure that transportation spending decisions are made with a view toward more than just road capacity. Click on the headline for the link to the full article.

WASHINGTON — So much of politics here in the nation’s capital is about moving money from someone’s pocket to someone else’s. As a result, the threat of generational or sectional warfare frequently lurks below the surface of budget debates.

That’s why it’s refreshing when think tanks and politicians disseminate ideas that can expand — rather than redistribute — the nation’s economic pie. They do this by enabling policies that unlock value-creation.

Take federal transportation funding. The worthy idea of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation is to direct no less than 5 percent of federal highway funding to information technology-based transit projects.

The concept is not yet implemented into law. But developments here this week could tee up the idea for the future.

[more...]

Drew Clark can be reached via email: drew@drewclark.com, or on Twitter @drewclark, or at www.utahbreakfast.com.
— http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865629332/Congress-should-modernize-highway-funding-with-chips-not-concrete.html?pg=all

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Utah lawmakers remain skeptical as committee negotiates Medicaid expansion solution - Good4Utah.com

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Utah lawmakers remain skeptical as committee negotiates Medicaid expansion solution - Good4Utah.com

ABC 4 Utah's take, with video from yesterday's Utah Breakfast Club luncheon, on the Medicaid expansion debate.

SALT LAKE CITY(ABC 4 Utah) – Lawmakers, policy experts and others were talking health care at the Capitol Thursday. Specifically, the challenges brought on by the Affordable Care Act.

”I want to find a solution, a sustainable one,” said Representative Jim Dunnigan, (R-Taylorsville).

A solution to the coverage gap that left thousands of Utahns with no option for insurance.

Dunnigan is on the committee looking for a solution, which for now is working behind closed doors.
— http://www.good4utah.com/story/d/story/utah-lawmakers-remain-skeptical-as-committee-negot/14388/VtvyczDklEmzJ8JmwEwAUA


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Herbert, Dunnigan confident Utah Medicaid expansion plan on track for July deadline | The Salt Lake Tribune

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Herbert, Dunnigan confident Utah Medicaid expansion plan on track for July deadline | The Salt Lake Tribune

The Salt Lake Tribune also provided a write-up of the Utah Breakfast Club event at the State Capitol yesterday.

Some fresh ideas about how to expand Medicaid have “percolated” since the legislative session ended, but one of the chief architects continued to speak only in broad terms Thursday.

”There’s a lot of nuanced ideas we can put together and come up with a good solution,” House Majority Leader Jim Dunnigan said after a luncheon at the Capitol Rotunda.

Dunnigan was one of five panelists invited by the Utah Breakfast Club to discuss prospects for expansion of the health care system for the poor. He declined to be more specific with the 27 people attending, including five other lawmakers.
— http://www.sltrib.com/news/2514850-155/herbert-dunnigan-confident-utah-medicaid-expansion

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Solid Medicaid expansion solutions still absent as deadline looms | Deseret News

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Solid Medicaid expansion solutions still absent as deadline looms | Deseret News

The Deseret News provides coverage of Thursday's Utah Breakfast Club event on "Designing a Medicaid Expansion That is Fiscally Responsible."

SALT LAKE CITY — As state leaders continue to grapple with Medicaid expansion, Gov. Gary Herbert says they’re on track to have a plan in place this summer, but other lawmakers are indicating the possibility of continued delay.

House Majority Leader Jim Dunnigan, R-Taylorsville, a member of the legislative group assembled by the governor to have a plan for Medicaid ready by the end of July, suggested Thursday there’s still a chance Utahns may need to keep waiting due to ongoing uncertainty with the federal government.

“Certainly not now is still an option,” Dunnigan said following a panel discussion on Medicaid expansion at the Capitol. “But that’s not my goal. My goal is to find a solution.”

Uncertainty of the program’s cost sustainability still lingers after the group’s April meeting in Washington, D.C., with U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell. Conversation among lawmakers and policy experts continued during a discussion hosted by the Utah Breakfast Club, founded by Deseret News columnist Drew Clark.
— http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865628715/Solid-Medicaid-expansion-solutions-still-absent-as-deadline-looms.html


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